The Evil Within: Quick Game Review

However, the positive side of the scale is not exactly empty, and offers more than enough to consider The Evil Within as a good game. Despite some not very well resolved topical elements (such as the same protagonist, a generic detective), the fragmented structure of the script, jumping between many different times and locations, it strengthens the feeling of helplessness and vulnerability. It does not allow us to get used to the environment.

The design of the monsters is another point in the game. Strange creatures we face are as disturbing as suggested. Moviegoers will find visual parallels in horror cult titles such as Tetsuo: The Iron Man or Hostel; some images have reminded me Cronenberg films like Videodrome. There are many game situations that work very well visually, such as the journey through the strange sanatorium mirrors, where we can save the game.

In the playable, The Evil Within is based on key gender to build a voltage scare easy experience. Scarcity of resources forces us to think before acting and consider the scenes as a small puzzle. We die many times but it is satisfying to see that you’ve passed another scene with more ingenuity and skill, not pure luck. In addition, the system improves skills as The Evil Within allow us to go adapting the experience to strengthen the weaknesses of our style of play.

The Evil Within is a good return to genus by Shinji Mikami, but it also has its flaws. A playable level manages to create tension in the player, but in return we require some patience to find solutions based on trial and error. The script has good ideas and a well posed nonlinear structure; Unfortunately, the least interesting element is the protagonist. It is in the visual which highlights more to an excellent design of monsters and environments. Survival horror fans can rest easy: Mikami has not lost his touch.